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RTJ Flanges vs RF Flanges

Ring type joint and raised face flanges are two of the most popular options in the industry today. When we talk about these types of flanges and their differences, we are referring to choosing the best type of flange to create an effective seal. Today we’re going to...

Flange Faces

As you start to consider purchasing flanges or gaskets, you’ll see a variety of terms used that you may not have come across before. Flange faces are the surface area that will receive the gasket, allowing them to come together to create a seal when put under...

Octagonal Ring Type Joints

A ring-type joint is a metallic ring that is machined to sit between two mating surfaces, where it will be compressed to provide a high-quality and reliable seal. Ring-type joints are vital components in various applications across multiple industry sectors,...

Blind Flange vs Blank Flange

Small pieces of mechanical equipment flanges continually play a vital role across numerous industries and applications. In essence, we use flanges to connect pipes to each other, with flanges also found in valves and specific application fittings too. Due to the...

Types of Flanges

Businesses in a variety of industries rely on flanges to join pipes or components together or to keep equipment secured to a surface. When it comes to choosing the best types of flange for your processes, you’ll want to take the time to research the different options...

Threaded Flange

Threaded flanges are probably the most recognisable of all flanges due to their screw thread design that is used to connect it to the pipe. Threaded flanges, also known as screwed flanges (for obvious reasons), require a male and female thread to create a connection...

Slip On Flange

A slip-on flange can also be known as a hubbed flange, which, as the name suggests, has a hub with a very low profile. Why is this important? Because this type of ring type joint gasket has an internal diameter larger than the connecting pipe, allowing you to slide it...

Weld Neck Flange

Also known as tapered hub flanges or high hub flanges, weld neck flanges are a specific type of gasket with a protruding ridge and long neck used to connect pipework and provide you with a high-quality seal. Weld neck flanges, in particular, are a popular choice when...

Nitrile vs Viton® – What is the Difference?

As you start to make a decision about what type of O-rings to purchase for your business, you might wonder what material is the most suitable for your unique needs. Every business operation has different requirements for their O-rings, such as the temperature,...

Aflas vs Viton

When it comes to choosing O ring suppliers in the UK, you’ll find that there are a wide range of materials on offer for you to choose from. Many people find that the options can seem quite overwhelming, with some materials having similar properties but offering...

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Spiral Wound Gaskets and Sheet Gaskets

Spiral Wound Gaskets and Sheet GasketsGaskets come in a range of different shapes and sizes.  All are offering similar functionality; gaskets are produced using a range of different materials to suit a range and a variety of environmental factors, industrial uses, and product requirements. 

When it comes to two of the most popular types of gaskets, spiral wound gaskets and sheets gaskets, there are some key differences to note. 

Which one you opt for of course depends on a range of different factors, your requirements and where and how the gasket is to be used. 

Difference between spiral wound gaskets and sheet gaskets 

Sheet gaskets, in their simplest form, is when a sheet of material has the gasket shape “punched out” of it.  The manufactured material can be made to different grades as well as thickness and materials used include rubber, paper, cork, non-asbestos materials, and graphite. 

Alternatively, spiral wound gaskets are constructed by winding the metal and filler together, with the filler providing the sealing capability and the metal providing the strength. 

At Specialist Sealing Products, we can provide you with both spiral wound gaskets and sheet gaskets, as well as providing bespoke gasket materials if a more customised approach is needed. 

But which gasket is best? 

This is entirely dependent on what that gasket is being used for and how ultimately it is being used. 

Gaskets and spiral wound gaskets play an essential role across a number of different products and most importantly across several different industry sectors too. 

Taking it back to the basics, ultimately gaskets are thin rings that act as seals between two surfaces.  Helping with padding, leak prevention, mounting, vibration minimisation, and also, and in some cases, most importantly, helping to protect against environmental contaminants. 

Due to their various uses, it’s essential to choose the right gasket for you.  Knowing the difference between spiral wound gaskets and sheet gaskets is a great start! 

At SSP, our team of gasket experts is always on hand to provide information and advice, offering the best technical help and support where we can. 

Below, we’ve pulled together some of the key differences and benefits to sheet gaskets and spiral wound gaskets so you can make a more informed decision. 

Find Out More Here!

Benefits of Spiral Wound Gaskets 

  • They’re reliable.  Due to the nature of how they are constructed, spiral wound gaskets are one of the most reliable gasket types across many different work environments. 
  • They require less clamping forces than sheet gaskets, so receive less overall wear and tear during the manufacturing and installation process. 
  • They’re strong and durable so help avoid early product life failure and costs associated with this. 
  • They can work in high temperature, corrosive, and high-pressure situations. 
  • Can withstand fluctuations in pressure and temperature. 
  • Generally, round in shape but can be customised to suit. 

Benefits of Sheet Gaskets 

  • They’re affordable as they can be mass-produced. 
  • They can be produced quickly. 
  • They can fulfil chemical operation requirements. 
  • Certification and traceable certification can be supplied with your chosen material. 

Ultimately gaskets, for all small in size and looking like a simple flat disc with the centre ring punched out, should not be underestimated. 

Gaskets play a big part in the industrial world.  Providing the cushioning element where different parts come to join together.  Preventing leaks and hazards from occurring. Gaskets can also store energy between pieces making mechanical operations, possible. 

If you’re interested to find out more about the different types of gaskets and the difference between spiral wound and sheet gaskets, call the experts at Specialist Sealing Products, we’d be happy to help.

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