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Threaded Flange

Threaded flanges are probably the most recognisable of all flanges due to their screw thread design that is used to connect it to the pipe. Threaded flanges, also known as screwed flanges (for obvious reasons), require a male and female thread to create a connection...

Slip On Flange

A slip-on flange can also be known as a hubbed flange, which, as the name suggests, has a hub with a very low profile. Why is this important? Because this type of ring type joint gasket has an internal diameter larger than the connecting pipe, allowing you to slide it...

Weld Neck Flange

Also known as tapered hub flanges or high hub flanges, weld neck flanges are a specific type of gasket with a protruding ridge and long neck used to connect pipework and provide you with a high-quality seal. Weld neck flanges, in particular, are a popular choice when...

Nitrile vs Viton® – What is the Difference?

As you start to make a decision about what type of O-rings to purchase for your business, you might wonder what material is the most suitable for your unique needs. Every business operation has different requirements for their O-rings, such as the temperature,...

Aflas vs Viton

When it comes to choosing O ring suppliers in the UK, you’ll find that there are a wide range of materials on offer for you to choose from. Many people find that the options can seem quite overwhelming, with some materials having similar properties but offering...

EPDM Gasket

Both the automotive and construction industries have started to use EPDM gaskets more frequently in recent times. This rubber material is UV light resistant and has many fantastic properties that make this part highly effective for a wide range of processes. Keep...

Metal Gaskets

When comparing gaskets for use within your business processes, you’ll find that these can be made from a variety of materials. Metal gaskets are a very popular option, offering many advantages over other materials. When looking at sealing product options, make sure...

AFLAS o ring

O rings come in many different dimensions, thicknesses, and materials. And it is the various different materials that o rings can be manufactured from that make each o ring unique and suitable for specific applications. In fact, there are hundreds of different types...

O Ring Vulcanization Process

With years of o ring knowledge and experience in o ring vulcanization, we're one of the leading experts in providing the right sealing solution for you. To view our full range, visit our O-ring product page, with a wide selection and something to match every...

What is a Window Seal?

A window seal is something that nearly all of us will have seen in our homes or workplaces and is designed to help make your building more comfortable. Within our range of Sealing Specialist Products, we offer a selection of window seals designed for various...

See our latest catalogue for all the services we offer.

O-Ring: Materials and Usage

Rubber O-Rings Industrial use. on white background.What is an O-ring?

There are many definitions of O-rings. In essence, it is a seal that has the form of a ring with a circular cross-section. O-rings are typically made of rubber and are primarily used for sealing purposes in swivelling joints.

There are many different types of O-rings, and how they look and what they are made of depends on their application. O-rings play an integral part in modern-day engineering and O-ring failure have been known to have disastrous consequences.

When it comes to engineering, nothing beats the importance of proper sealing and isolation. Your selection of O-rings can have a significant influence on the success of your prototype, vehicle or design. O-rings also play a pivotal role in ensuring durability, performance, and minimalisation of the risk of failure. Let’s take a look at some of the things that you should consider when selecting an O-ring.

Material

The material that you choose has to be compatible with other factors and applications of your design. If the material of your O-ring design is not compatible with the rest of your design, it can be detrimental to the functionality and overall effectiveness.

The O-ring material should be compatible with the operating fluid. If not, the operating fluid can cause the O-ring to swell and deteriorate, diminishing it’s sealing ability and increase the risk of failure.

The O-ring material should also be able to withstand the fluctuations in temperature. Temperatures that are too cold can harden the O-ring, causing it to snap. If the O-ring is made from the wrong materials, temperatures that are too high can also reduce the O-ring’s sealing abilities.

If the overall design is applied in a manner that changes the pressure around the O-ring, its material should enable the O-ring to maintain its sealing abilities nonetheless.

Seal Grove Surface

The seal groove surface of the O-ring housing is particularly important to ensure maximum performance and effectiveness of the overall design. The surface is too rough; there can be microscopic openings between the O-ring itself and the surface of the seal housing. This reduces the O-ring’s ability to seal the surface effectively. A sealing house surface that is too smooth, on the other hand, can cause an aqua-plane effect and also diminishes the O-ring’s sealing ability. It is, therefore, clear that the surface roughness should be somewhere in between.

Generally speaking, a seal groove surface of 16 rms will ensure optimal sealing for gases where a sealing grove surface of 32 rms works best for fluids. If the objective is dynamic applications, make sure that the O-ring’s surface housing has an rms of anything between 6 to 18.

Conclusion

Before selecting an O-ring for your application, it is important to ensure that you understand the sealing requirements of your design. Keep all the circumstances of the design’s functionality in mind, including temperature and pressure. Make sure that the O-ring material is compatible with the operating fluid and that the roughness of the housing surface allows for optimal sealing.

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